Research

Melinda Daniels

Melinda Daniels Ph.D.

Associate Research Scientist

Fluvial Geomorphology

970 Spencer Road

Avondale, PA 19311

610.268.2153, ext. 268

610.268.0490 Fax

Email

Research Interests

My research program focuses broadly on the fluvial geomorphology, hydrology and stream ecosystem ecology of both “natural” and human-modified river systems from reach to watershed scales. These interests include fields such as river restoration, watershed management and stream ecosystem science. Though much of it is theoretically based, all of my research is placed within the context of better understanding our impact on rivers, improving our management of rivers, and enabling our successful restoration of rivers. This includes the examination of how people perceive river environments, and the process of communicating science to river managers and stakeholders. Essentially, my research perspective examines rivers as coupled human and natural systems.

Education

Ph.D., 2003. Physical Geography, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Illinois.

Master of Research in Environmental Science, 1997. University College London, London, United Kingdom.

B.S., 1996. Natural Resources and Environmental Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York.

Previous Positions

2010-2013 Associate Professor, Kansas State University, Department of Geography, Physical and Environmental Geography

2008-2010 Assistant Professor, Kansas State University, Department of Geography, Physical and Environmental Geography

2002-2008 Assistant Professor, University of Connecticut, Department of Geography, Physical and Environmental Geography

2001-2002 Instructor, University of Illinois

1998-2001 Research Assistant and Fellow, University of Illinois, Stream Confluence Dynamics, River Restoration Science

Teaching Experience

2008-2013 Kansas State University. Environmental Geography, World Regional Geography, Fluvial Geomorphology, Methods Theories and Models in Geography, Geographic Information Systems I, Graduate Seminar in River Regimes.

2002-2008 University of Connecticut. Introduction to Physical Geography, Fluvial Geomorphology, Advanced Seminar in Fluvial Geomorphology, Advanced Seminar in Coastal Geomorphology, Environmental Evaluation and Assessment, Environmental Planning and Management, Environmental Restoration, Advanced Seminar in Environmental Restoration.

2002 University of Illinois. Introduction to Physical Geography.

Projects

Christina River Basin Critical Zone Observatory

The University of Delaware and Stroud Water Research Center received a grant from the National Science Foundation to establish the Christina River Basin as a “Critical Zone Observatory” for researching questions relating to climate change. Scientists define the “critical zone” as the portion of the planet from the treetops to the groundwater that sustains terrestrial life.

Using the 565-square-mile Christina River Basin as their laboratory, the scientific team work to determine how, and how rapidly, soil erosion and sediment transport through rivers impact the exchange of carbon between the land and the atmosphere, and affect climate.

For more information, visit criticalzone.org/christina.

Long-Term Research in Environmental Biology: White Clay Creek, Pennsylvania

In 1998, the White Clay Creek experimental watershed, extending from Stroud Water Research Center north to the headwaters, was designated as a site for long-term research in environmental biology (LTREB). The National Science Foundation LTREB grant to Center scientists recognizes that many important questions in ecology require the acquisition of long time series of data. NSF funds are being use to help maintain an on-going long-term research project examining stream and watershed characteristics associated with a riparian zone restoration/reforestation.

In this LTREB project, the overarching goals involve discerning the time period, most salient features, and final condition of a recovered state. LTREB funding is being used to: (1) maintain existing watershed installations to continue an on-going acquisition of long-term data on White Clay Creek, (2) address the data management needs of the long-term project, including making the data available to the research community, and (3) testing hypotheses concerning long-term variations in stream ecosystem structure and function under stable and/or recovering conditions.

For more information, visit our LTREB White Clay Creek pages.

Grazing Impacts on Tallgrass Prairie Streams, Kansas

American bison

The primary goal of this project is to advance our understanding of how watershed grazing treatments influence grassland headwater stream geomorphology and sediment transport regimes. We are conducting this research at the NSF supported Konza Prairie Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in Kansas.

Studies conducted in non-grassland ecoregions have clearly established cattle as important geomorphic agents in the fluvial landscape capable of dramatically increasing suspended sediment yields. However, a rigorous understanding of the specific mechanisms driving high sediment yields are lacking because of flawed or constrained sampling designs in past experiments, including very short grazing treatment periods, upstream confounding influences (such as different grazing treatments, dams, road crossings, farmland etc.), and lack of experimental replication.

Furthermore, past studies have failed to investigate relative impacts produced by different species of grazer (e.g. cattle vs. bison), different grazing densities, or different rangeland burning regimes. No geomorphic grazing impacts studies have been conducted in tallgrass prairie headwater streams, despite heavy grazing pressure on these systems. Particularly lacking in all previous research is a controlled, paired-watershed approach to addressing the relationships between watershed grazing treatment and stream geomorphology.

Specific research objectives include: (1) determine which specific channel adjustment processes are contributing to sediment yields and how these are influenced by grazing treatments, (2) determine which specific hillslope processes are contributing to sediment yields and how these are influenced by grazing treatments, and (3) determine how grazing treatments influence in-channel suspended, deposited, and bedload sediment transport dynamics and channel forms.

Much of this work forms the dissertation research of Bart Gruszinski, doctoral candidate at Kansas State University.

Support for this project is derived from the NSF LTER site grant as well as NSF Geography and Spatial Sciences.

Impacts of Pine Beetle Forest Loss and Water Diversion on Large Wood Dynamics of Headwater Streams of the Medicine Bow National Forest, Wyoming

Mountain Pine Beetle tree mortality

The primary goal of this research is to understand two widespread disturbance processes have influence headwater stream morphology and large wood mass balances.

Research from previous studies has shown that Mountain Pine Beetle outbreaks are a natural and integral part of forest ecology in the study region. However, the current outbreak is more extensive than previously observed, likely as a result of warming global temperatures. Pine forests of the Rockies are severely impacted from New Mexico to Canada, with some forests experiencing 100% tree mortality. Such widespread tree death is likely to radically alter wood loading to stream channels, many of which are altered by irrigation diversions.

Irrigation ditch diversion structure

Specific research objectives include: (1) Determine how large woody debris loading varies across the spectrum of early- to late-stage pine beetle infestation, (2) Qualitatively and quantitatively analyze how the influx of pine beetle-killed wood alters stream channel morphology, and (3) Determine the influence of water diversion structures on large woody accumulations and channel morphology.

Much of this work forms the dissertation research of Bryce Marston, doctoral candidate at Kansas State University.

Support for this project is derived from the United States Forest Service.

The Impact of Historical Logging Activities on Mountain Stream Ecogeomorphology in the Rocky Mountains, CO and WY

Tie Drive on a Wyoming River. Photo courtesy of Grand Encampment Museum

In this project, doctoral candidate Claire Ruffing is exploring historic stream channel disturbances and their associated implications for stream ecosystem functioning.

Previous research has demonstrated strong relationships between stream geomorphology and ecosystem processes such as stream metabolism, but little is known about how past stream channel disturbances influence these relationships or how streams recover from these historic disturbances. Understanding the link between geomorphic processes and ecosystem function as well as how these relationships are affected by disturbance has implications for the environmental management of streams, particularly the practice of stream restoration. Ecosystem metabolism refers to the balance between the processes of gross primary production (GPP) by algal and aquatic plant communities and ecosystem respiration (ER), which accounts for the total consumption of organic carbon by all aquatic communities in the system. Light, temperature, stream flow, and channel complexity all interact and influence rates of GPP and ER as well as the relative ratio of these two processes.

Doctoral candidate Claire Ruffing surveying a stream channel at Fraser Experimental Forest, CO.

This research will address the degree to which past stream channel disturbances and recent restoration efforts affect these abiotic controls as well as whether there is an associated impact on GPP, ER and ecosystem metabolism as a whole.

The primary research questions are 1) how do structural and functional geomorphic characteristics vary between disturbed, reference, and restored channel conditions and 2) how do GPP and ER respond to these changes. The disturbance context for this research are mountain streams that were impacted by a forest harvesting strategy known as tie-driving, which refers to the systematic clearing and channelizing streams in the west to aid in the transport of railroad ties. This practice was very common in Wyoming and Colorado and the legacy of this practice is still evident on the landscape today.

The study systems for this project are located in Medicine Bow National Forest in southern Wyoming and Fraser Experimental Forest in north central Colorado.

Support for this project is derived from NSF Geography and Spatial Sciences.

Publications

Larson D.M., B.P. Grudzinski, W.K. Dodds, M. Daniels, A. Skibbe, A. Joern (In Press). Blazing and grazing: influences of fire and bison on tallgrass prairie stream water quality, Freshwater Science.

Burchsted, D., Daniels, M.D., (In Press) Beaver dams in northeastern Connecticut, U.S.A.: Classification of smallscale discontinuities that generate large-scale complexity, Geomorphology

Plater, A.J., Daniels, M.D. and Oguchi, T. 2013 Present Research Frontiers in Geomorphology, Treatise in Geomorphology, Volume 1, Pages 349-376, Elsevier.

Chin, A., Laurencio, L., Wohl, E., Daniels, M.D., Urban, M., Boyer, K., Butt, A., Piegay, H., and Greory, K. 2012. The significance of perceptions and feedbacks for effectively managing wood in rivers, River Research and Applications, published online early view: 24 OCT 2012, DOI: 10.1002/rra.2617

Fischer*, J., Paukert, C. and Daniels, M.D. 2012. Fish community response to habitat alteration: impacts of sand dredging in the Kansas River, Transactions of the American Fisheries Society, 141:6, 1532-1544

Costigan*, K.H. and Daniels, M.D., 2012. Damming the prairie: Human alteration of Great Plains river regimes. Journal of Hydrology, 444-445, 90-99.

Costigan*, K.H. and Daniels, M.D., 2012. Spatial pattern, density, and characteristics of large wood in Connecticut streams: Implications for stream restoration priorities in southern New England. River Research and Applications, In Press, available online, DOI: 10.1002/rra.158.

Daniels, M.D. and McCusker, M.H. 2011. Reply to Bunte et al. (2011) “Discussion of Daniels and McCusker (2010): Operator bias characterizing stream substrates using Wolman pebble counts with a standard measurement template.” Geomorphology 115, 194–198. Geomorphology, 134, 501-502.3

Burchsted, D., Daniels, M.D., Thorson, R.M., and Vokoun, J.C. 2010. The river discontinuum: beavers (castor canadensis) and baseline conditions for restoration of forested headwaters. Bioscience, 60(11): 908-921.

Daniels, M.D. and McCusker, M.H. 2010. Operator bias characterizing stream substrates using Wolman pebble counts with a standard measurement template. Geomorphology, 115: 194–198.

M. D. Daniels, D. Burchsted, J. MacBroom, L. Wildman, S. Harold, M. Carabetta, P. Woodworth, and G. Boardman 2010. Redefining the Dam Removal Paradigm in Formerly Glaciated Forested Headwater Systems, Proceedings of the EWRI/ASCE Congress, 2010.

D. Burchsted, M. D. Daniels, and R. M. Thorson. 2010. Restoring the River Discontinuum: Looking at the Example of Beaver Dams, Proceedings of the EWRI/ASCE Congress, 2010.

McCusker, M.H., and Daniels, M.D. 2009. The potential influence of small dams on basin sediment dynamics and coastal erosion in Connecticut. Middle States Geographer, 41:82-90.

Daniels, M.D., Boardman, G.C., and Woodworth*, P.M. 2008. Assessing dam removal impacts on downstream geomorphic stability using hydrodynamic modeling. Papers of the Applied Geography Conference, 31: 133-141.

Chin, A., Daniels, M.D., Urban, M., Piegay, H., Gregory, K.J., Gregory, S.V., Wohl, E., Laurencio, L., Bigler, W., Boyer, K., Grable, J., LaFrenz, M. 2008. Perceptions of Wood in Rivers and Challenges for Stream Restoration in the United States. Environmental Management, 41(6): 893-903.

Rhoads, B.L., Garcia, M.H., Rodriguez, J., Bombardelli, F., Abad, J., and Daniels, M. 2008. Methods for evaluating the geomorphological performance of naturalized rivers: examples from the Chicago metropolitan area. Uncertainty in River Restoration, Sears, D. and Darby, S. (editors). Wiley, Chichester, pp. 209-228.

Daniels, M.D. and Rhoads, B.L. 2007. Influence of experimental removal of large woody debris on spatial patterns of three-dimensional flow in a low-energy meander bend: A LWD removal experiment. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 32: 460-474.

Daniels, M.D. 2006. Grain size sorting in meander bends containing large woody debris. Physical Geography, 24(7): 348-362.

Daniels, M.D. 2006. Distribution and dynamics of large woody debris and organic matter in a low-energy meandering stream. Geomorphology, 77(3-4): 286-298. Urban, M.A. and Daniels, M.D., 2006. Exploring the links between geomorphology and ecology. Geomorphology, 77(3-4): 203-206.

Daniels, M.D. and Rhoads, B.L. 2004. Effect of LWD Configuration on Spatial Patterns of Three- Dimensional Flow in Two Low-Energy Meander Bends at Varying Stages. Water Resources Research, 40 (11) W11302 10.1029/2004WR003181 25 November 2004

Daniels, M.D. and Rhoads, B.L. 2004. Spatial patterns of turbulence kinetic energy and shear stress in a meander bend with large woody debris. Chapter in the American Geophysical Union Monograph volume entitled “Riparian Vegetation and Fluvial Geomorphology: Hydraulic, Hydrologic and Geotechnical Interactions”, S. Bennett and A. Simon (eds.).

Daniels, M.D. and Rhoads, B.L. 2003. Influence of a large woody debris obstruction on threedimensional flow structure in a meander bend. Geomorphology, 51, 159-173.

Wade, R.J., Rhoads, B.L., Rodriguez, J., Daniels, M.D., Wilson, D., Herricks, E.E., Bombardelli, F., Garcia, M., and Schwartz, J. 2002. Integrating Science and Technology to Support Stream Naturalization near Chicago, Illinois. Journal of the American Water Resources Association, 38, 931-944.

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Presentations

Daniels, M.D. and Costigan, K.H. Human Alteration of Great Plains River Regimes and Implications for Aquatic Species Management, Annual Meeting of the Association of American Geographers, New York, NY, Feb 24-28, 2012

Daniels, M.D., The local hydraulic and geomorphic effects of natural large wood structures, Technical Workshop on Large Wood Applications and Research Needs in River Restoration, sponsored by the US Bureau of Reclamation and the US Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle, WA, Feb 14-15, 2012 (INVITED)

 Daniels, M.D. and Costigan, K.H. Human Alteration of Great Plains River Regimes and Implications for Aquatic Species Management, Kansas Natural Resources Conference, Wichita, KS, Jan 26-27, 2012

Fischer, J., Paukert, C. and Daniels, M.D. Human Alteration of Great Plains River Regimes and Implications for Aquatic Species Management, Kansas Natural Resources Conference, Wichita, KS, Jan 26-27, 2012

Mehl, H.E., Pockrandt, B., Daniels, M.D., Annett, C.A., Calwell, L. and Daniels, R. Developing a public database of geospatial information for the Kansas River Watershed, Kansas Natural Resources Conference, Wichita, KS, Jan 26-27, 2012

Daniels, M.D. and Grudzinski, B. Hydrology and Geomorphology of Tallgrass Prairie Intermittent Headwater Streams, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 4-9, 2011

Costigan, K.H. and Daniels, M.D. Hydrologic Alteration of Great Plains Rivers, American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, CA, December 4-9, 2011

Grudzinski, B. and Daniels, M.D. Impact of Cattle and Bison Grazing on Stream Morphology in a Tallgrass Prairie, GPRM AAG Regional Division Meeting, Denver, CO, October 6-8, 2011

Ruffing, C. and Daniels, M.D. Using Lidar to Assess Local Water Resource Concerns at a Watershed Scale, GPRM AAG Regional Division Meeting, Denver, CO, October 6-8, 2011

Mehl, H. and Daniels, M.D. Water Quality and Channel Stability on the Prairie Band Potawatomi Reservation, GPRM AAG Regional Division Meeting, Denver, CO, October 6-8, 2011

Costigan, K.H. and Daniels, M.D. Damming the Prairie: Human Alteration of Great Plains River Regimes, GPRM AAG Regional Division Meeting, Denver, CO, October 6-8, 2011

Terry, E. Bartlett, S., Ruffing, C. Daniels, M.D., and Marston, B. Effects of Water Diversions on Drainage Basins in the Medicine Bow National Forest. GPRM AAG Regional Division Meeting, Denver, CO, October 6-8, 2011

Mehl, H.E., Pockrandt, B., Calwell, L., Annett, C. and Daniels, M.D. An Inventory of the Kansas River. Water and the Future of Kansas Conference, Topeka, KS, September 30, 2011

Dodds, W.K., Gido, K., Whiles, M.R., and Daniels, M.D. Grassland Streams. Grasslands in a Global Context, Manhattan, KS, September 12-14, 2011

Grudzinski, B. and Daniels, M.D. Influence of Grazing Treatments on Stream Substrate and Channel Geometry in the Flint Hills, Kansas. Grasslands in a Global Context, Manhattan, KS, September 12-14, 2011

Fischer, J., Gerken, J., Paukert, C. and Daniels, M.D. Habitat and Fish Community Response to Sand Dredging In a Large Great Plains River. The American Fisheries Society 141st Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA Sept. 4-8, 2011

Daniels, M.D. and Grudzinski, B. Impacts of Grazing and Riparian Management on Geomorphology of Prairie Streams. The 21st Annual Konza Prairie LTER Workshop, Manhattan, KS, April 16th, 2011.

Daniels, M.D. The Great Failures Of River Conservation And Restoration — Can Redemption Be Found In An Emerging Fluvial Landscape Ecology? Invited Seminar, University of Missouri Department of Geography, Columbia, MO, March 11, 2011

 Daniels, M.D., Fischer, J., Gerken, J., Costigan, K.H. and Paukert, C. Using Hydroacoustic Technology to Assess the Impacts of In-Channel Dredging on Hydraulic Habitat Conditions in the Kansas river. 2011 USGS National Surface Water Conference, Tampa, FL, March 28-April 1, 2011

Grudzinski, B.,and Daniels, M.D. Influence of Grazing Treatments on Stream Geomorphology in the Flint Hills, Kansas Natural Resources Conference, January 20-21, 2011, Wichita, KS.

Fischer, J., Gerken, J., Paukert, C., and Daniels, M.D. Fish Community Response to Habitat Alteration: Impacts of Sand Dredging in the Kansas River, 71st Midwest Fisheries and Wildlife Conference, Minneapolis, MN, December 12-15, 2010

Fischer, J., Gerken, J., Paukert, C., and Daniels, M.D. Influence of Sand Dredging on Fish Communities in the Kansas River, Kansas Natural Resources Conference, Wichita, KS, January 20-21, 2011

Russell, D.M., Dodds, W.K., Grudzinski, B. and Daniels, M.D. Effects of Bison and Prescribed Fire on Prairie Stream Sediments, Kansas Natural Resources Conference, January 20-21, 2011, Wichita, KS.

Fischer, J., Gerken, J., Paukert, C. and Daniels, M.D. Fish community response to habitat alteration: Impacts of sand dredging in the Kansas River, Midwest Fish and Wildlife Conference, Minneapolis, MN, December 2010

Daniels, M.D. Hook, L.M., Sheeley, J. Brown, T. Spatial and temporal lateral discontinuity on the preengineered Missouri River, GSA Annual Meeting, , Denver, CO, November 2010

Burchsted, D. Daniels, M. D. Beaver dam impacts on sediment and water regime, GSA Annual Meeting, Denver, CO, November 2010 Daniels, M. D., Burchsted, D. Incorporating pre-disturbance discontinuity into dam removal and river restoration paradigms, GPRM Regional AAG, Lawrence, KS, October 2010

Costigan, K.M., Daniels, M.D., Gritzmacher, G.G. Evaluating local bed shear stress estimates in meander bends using acoustic Doppler velocimeter data, GPRM Regional AAG, Lawrence, KS, October 2010

Daniels, M.D., Burchsted, D. , MacBroom, J., Wildman, L., Harold, S., Carabetta, M., Woodworth, P., and Boardman, G. Redefining the Dam Removal Paradigm in Formerly Glaciated Forested Headwater Systems, EWRI/ASCE World Environmental and Water Resources Congress, 2010, Providence, Rhode Island, May 16-20, 2010

Burchsted, D., Daniels, M.D., and Thorson R.M. Restoring the River Discontinuum: Looking at the Example of Beaver Dams, EWRI/ASCE World Environmental and Water Resources Congress, 2010, Providence, Rhode Island, May 16-20, 2010

Banner, E. and M. D. Daniels Documenting the historical spatial extent and character of riparian forests in Kansas using General Land Office Survey Records, Kansas Natural Resources Conference, Wichita, KS, February 4-5, 2010

Book Reviews, Reports, and Other Publications

Sand Dredging Effects on Fishes and Fish Habitat in the Kansas River. 2012. Report to the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, Recreation and Tourism.

Seasonal Fish Assemblages and Habitat Effects near Bowersock Dam: Implications for Fish Passage. 2012. Report to the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, Recreation and Tourism.

Assessing the Impact of Channel and Riparian Zone Modifications on Aquatic Biodiversity in the Kansas River Basin. Report to the Kingsbury Family Foundation.

Book Review: Urban Watersheds: Geology, Contamination and Sustainable Development. Martin M. Kaufman, Daniels T. Rogers and Kent. S. Murray. Boca Raton: CRC Press, 2011. 547 pp., The Professional Geographer, in press.

Watershed Assessment of the Wakarusa River, KS. 2012. Report to the Kansas Department of Health and the Environment.

Wildcat Creek (KS) Watershed Assessment. 2011. Report to the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service and US Army (Fort Riley).

Processes Shaping the Distribution of Freshwater Mussels in Connecticut. 2010. Report to the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection.

Habitat and Flushing Flow Evaluation of the Farmington River Wild and Scenic Reach, CT. 2009. Report to The National Park Service.

Post-Ice Control Structure Geomorphological Assessment of the Salmon River. 2008. Report to The Nature Conservancy (CT office).

Book Review: Hydrological Applications of GIS. A.M. Gurnell and D.R. Montgomery (Editors). John Wiley and Sons, 2000. 173 pages. Geomorphology, 54, 347-351.

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Grants & Contracts

Melinda Daniels (PI), with J. Aistrup, J. Bergtold, M. Caldas, K. Douglas-Mankin, D. Haukos, J. Hierr-Stamm, M. Mather, and A. Sheshukov, CNH: Coupled Climate, Cultivation, and Culture in the Great Plains: Understanding Water Supply and Water Quality in a Fragile Landscape, 2013-2016, National Science Foundation, $1,440,000

Melinda Daniels (PI) and Bartosz Grudzinski, Doctoral Dissertation Research: Influence of Grazing Differences on Stream Geomorphology in Tallgrass Prairie Headwater Streams, 2013, National Science Foundation $15,759

Melinda Daniels (PI) and Claire Ruffing, Doctoral Dissertation Research: The Impact of Historical Logging Activities on the Ecology and Geomorphology of Mountain Streams, 2013, National Science Foundation $15,972

Melinda Daniels (PI), Impacts of In-Channel Sand Mining on the Geomorphology of the Kansas River, 2012-2014, Kansas Water Resources Institute (USGS), $53,390.

Melinda Daniels (PI) and Katie H. Costigan, Doctoral Dissertation Research: Thermal, Hydraulic and Geomorphological Dynamics at Stream Confluences, Submitted to Geography and Spatial Sciences, 2012, National Science Foundation $11,695

Melinda Daniels (PI), Watershed Assessment of the Wakarusa River, KS, Blue Earth LLC/Kansas Department of Health and the Environment, 9/19/2011-12/15/2012, $14,000.

Melinda Daniels (PI), Impacts of Large-Scale Forest Loss on Stream Channel Form, Process and Sedimentation, US Forest Service (USDA), 8/19/11-8/20/15, $49,667

Keith B. Gido, Joshuah S. Perkin, Melinda Daniels (co-PI) and Katie H. Costigan, Reproductive Life History Of Great Plains Pelagic-Spawning Fishes In The Ninnescah River, Kansas, FY 2011 State Wildlife Subgrant Program, Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, 5/1/2011 to 4/30/2013, $192,675

Melinda Daniels (PI) Assessing the Impact of Channel and Riparian Zone Modifications on Aquatic Biodiversity in the Kansas River Basin, Kingsbury Family Foundation, 12/25/2011-12/25/2012, $24,951 Melinda Daniels (PI) American Rivers Patapsco River Restoration Project, McCormick Taylor, INC, 12/18/2010-12/18/2012, $11,299

Melinda Daniels (PI) KSU ORSP Faculty Development Award for travel to the 12th International Symposium on the Interactions between Sediments and Water, UK, (June, 2011) $1,200 Melinda Daniels (PI) Wildcat Creek Watershed Assessment, US Department of Agriculture/Blue Earth, LLC, 10/10-1/11, $7,400

Melinda Daniels (PI) Subcontract to Konza NSF LTER for geomorphology research support, 8/2010- 8/2011, $26,000 Craig Paukert and Melinda Daniels (co-PI) Sand Dredging Effects on Fishes and Fish Habitat in the Kansas River, FY 2009 State Wildlife Subgrant Program, Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks, 1/2010-1/2012, $181,983

Keith Gido, Melinda Daniels (co-PI) and Joe Gerken Seasonal Fish Assemblages and Habitat Effects near Bowersock Dam: Implications for Fish Passage, FY 2009 State Wildlife Subgrant Program, Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks,1/2010-1/2012, $195,249

Melinda Daniels (PI) Hydraulic, Geomorphologic and Thermal Dynamics at Small Tributary Confluences, University Small Research Grant, Kansas State University, 2009, $1,500

Eric Schultz, Jason Vokoun and Melinda Daniels (Co-PI) Integrating Fluvial Geomorphology and Stream Ecology: Processes Shaping the Distribution of Freshwater Mussels in Connecticut, Connecticut Department of Environmental Proptection, 2007-2009, $16,185

Melinda Daniels (PI) Post-Ice Control Structure Geomorphological Assessment of the Salmon River, NOAA/The Nature Conservancy, 2007 $3,500 Melinda Daniels (PI) Fluvial Dynamics of Large River Secondary Channels: Channel Morphology, Hydraulic Habitat, and Potential for Restoration, National Science Foundation Geography and Spatial Sciences, 7/11/2006-3/11/2009, $56,793

Melinda Daniels (PI) The Nature Conservancy: Dam Removal Alternatives Assessment for Umpawaug Pond Brook, 6/2006-12/2007, $19,800 Melinda Daniels (PI) National Park Service/Farmington River Alliance: Habitat and Flushing Flow Evaluation of the Farmington River Wild and Scenic Reach, CT, 1/2007-8/2007, $12,000

Melinda Daniels (PI) UCONN Research Foundation Large Faculty Grant: Thermal Dynamics At Tributary Confluences: Geomorphological And Hydraulic Research To Support Restoration Design And Management, 2006, $10,573 Melinda Daniels (PI) Monitoring the Effects of Dam Removal, NOAA/The Nature Conservancy, 1/2006- 12/2006, $9,300

Jason Vokoun and Melinda Daniels (co-PI) CT Institute for Water Resources: Development and evaluation of a multi-dimensional spatially and temporally dynamic mesohabitat classification model for stream management and water flow allocation planning in southern New England streams, 2005-2007, $24,996

Melinda Daniels (PI) Pre-Ice Control Structure Geomorphological Assessment of the Salmon River, The Nature Conservancy, 6/2005-6/2006, $7,500

Melinda Daniels (PI) A preliminary study of the sediment dynamics of the Pomperaug River, Connecticut, Pomperaug River Watershed Coalition, 6/1/2004-9/1/2004 $2,000

Melinda Daniels (PI) Fluvial Dynamics of Large River Secondary Channels: Process, Form and Potential for Restoration, UCONN Research Foundation Faculty Grant Program, 6/2003-5/2004, $20,000

Bruce Rhoads and Melinda Daniels (Co-PI) Doctoral Dissertation Research: The Role of Large Woody Debris in the dynamics of a Low-Energy Meandering Stream in The Midwest, National Science Foundation Geography and Spatial Sciences, August 2000-August 2001, $9,274

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Memberships

Association of American Geographers
American Geophysical Union
Geological Society of America

Awards

Provosts Award: Development of new undergraduate curriculum: Global Change and Natural Hazards, University of Connecticut, 2006

Environmental Leadership Certificate of Appreciation (Finalist for Faculty Environmental Leadership Award) University of Connecticut Environmental Policy Advisory Council, 2005

University of Illinois Graduate Fellowship August 2001 - May 2002, $10,000

University of Illinois Joseph Russell Graduate Fellowship August 2000 - May 2001, $10,000

University of Illinois Charles S. Alexander Graduate Fellowship August 1999 - May 2000, $10,000

University of Illinois Graduate Program Enhancement Fellowship, August 1997 - May 1998, $10,000