Our Focus Is Fresh Water

Who We Are

Since 1967, Stroud™ Water Research Center has been focused on one thing — fresh water. We are dedicated to understanding the ecology of streams, rivers, and their watersheds — both pristine and polluted.

What We Do

The health of freshwater ecosystems is our first line of defense in preserving clean water — and clean water is essential to all life. Our freshwater research, education, and watershed restoration programs enable businesses, policymakers, landowners, and individuals to make informed decisions that affect water quality and availability around the world.

How You Can Help

Show your commitment to research and education programs that are helping to ensure clean and available water here and around the world — become a Friend of Stroud Water Research Center today.


What’s New at the Stroud Center

Brownie girl scouts working on badges

Girl and Boy Scout Programs Now Available

On Saturday April 30, Brownie Troop #4070 visited us to complete their Wonders of Water Journey badges. We will be hosting our first Boy Scout stream education program on Saturday, June 4. Learn more about our education programs

Photo of rusty crayfish.

Crayfish May Help Restore Dirty Streams, Stroud Study Finds

While macroinvertebrates are a tasty food source for crayfish, a new study reveals a surprising finding: When crayfish were present in in-stream experimental enclosures, macroinvertebrate density was higher, not lower.

Science Education Monthly Feature: Snake Eating Fish

Stroud Center scientists are often outside working in and around streams, and sometimes just happen to catch a view of the coolest things!

Check out this video with images of a water snake having its meal along the water’s edge. We’ll identify the species very soon, so stay tuned!

Photo of cows near a tree shelter.

Keeping Pathogens Out of
Drinking-Water Sources

Stroud Center scientists and a colleague from Lehigh University are studying how well best management practices on farms may protect drinking-water sources from pathogens like Cryptosporidium and E. coli. They are monitoring sites in the White Clay and Red Clay creek watersheds.

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